When my husband [Carl Sagan] died, because he was so famous and known for not being a believer, many people would come up to me — it still sometimes happens — and ask me if Carl changed at the end and converted to a belief in an afterlife. They also frequently ask me if I think I will see him again.

Carl faced his death with unflagging courage and never sought refuge in illusions. The tragedy was that we knew we would never see each other again. I don’t ever expect to be reunited with Carl. But, the great thing is that when we were together, for nearly twenty years, we lived with a vivid appreciation of how brief and precious life is. We never trivialized the meaning of death by pretending it was anything other than a final parting. Every single moment that we were alive and we were together was miraculous — not miraculous in the sense of inexplicable or supernatural. We knew we were beneficiaries of chance… That pure chance could be so generous and so kind… That we could find each other, as Carl wrote so beautifully in Cosmos, you know, in the vastness of space and the immensity of time… That we could be together for twenty years. That is something which sustains me and it’s much more meaningful.

The way he treated me and the way I treated him, the way we took care of each other and our family, while he lived. That is so much more important than the idea I will see him someday. I don’t think I’ll ever see Carl again. But I saw him. We saw each other. We found each other in the cosmos, and that was wonderful.

Ann Druyan  (via whyallcaps)

(via nugmother)


August rain: the best of the summer gone, and the new fall not yet born. The odd uneven time.
Sylvia Plath  (via funkypoolparty)

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viktoriabaksa:

Herbert James Draper - A water baby
oil on canvas

viktoriabaksa:

Herbert James Draper - A water baby

oil on canvas

(via wonderfuck)


(via h0megrown)



(via caligulette)


alongtimetoexist:

2headedsnake:

reblololo:

theshipthatflew:

Woman in WavesPostcard, Japanese, Late Meiji eraArtist Unknown
via mfa.org

alongtimetoexist:

2headedsnake:

reblololo:

theshipthatflew:

Woman in Waves
Postcard, Japanese, Late Meiji era
Artist Unknown

via mfa.org


spookyboy:

Heathers (1988)

spookyboy:

Heathers (1988)

(via witchchad)


I think it’s weird that teenage girls know more about giving blowjobs than they do about masturbation. It makes me sick to my stomach that so many young girls think sex is just about a guy finishing.